1-19-18 Sangha Update

Remember Them: Champions For Humanity Monument, by Oakland sculptor Mario Chiodo

“Christian, Jew, Muslim, shaman, Zoroastrian, stone, ground, mountain, river, each has a secret way of being with the mystery, unique and not to be judged”
Jalaluddin Mevlana Rumi

“It is never too late to give up your prejudices”
Henry David Thoreau

“Our ability to reach unity in diversity will be the beauty and the test of our civilisation.”
Mahatma Gandhi

“If we cannot end now our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity. For, in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s future. And we are all mortal.

[Commencement Address at American University, June 10 1963]”
John F. Kennedy

Dear Friends,

I hope you are all well and happy and experiencing a wonderful sense of interbeing with all beings on this beautiful planet of ours!

This is a reminder that we will be gathering on Sunday evening at 6 PM at the home of Cindy and John West (directions below). We will enjoy sitting/walking/sitting meditation, we will continue to look at the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh from his book “Silence” and share the Dharma. We hope that you will be able to be with us .

This is also a reminder that there will be an OI/Aspirant gathering at the Bell Street Chapel tomorrow morning at 10 AM. We will recite the 14 Mindfulness Trainings and share the Dharma. I will be offering a Dharma talk at the Radiant Bell Sangha meeting at 8 AM that morning.

ENGAGED PRACTICE
We will end our OI meeting before noon on Saturday so that we can take part in the Women’s March at the State House at noon.

Anyone who would like to join us…we will be gathering at the plaza in front of the State House on Smith Street before noon. If you would like to join us, you will hopefully be able to find us, as we will have the RI Community of Mindfulness Banner and a large banner with a photo of Thich Nhat Hanh. We will gather on the plaza and walk around the State House to join the Rally.

We had a much larger response than we had anticipated for the Day of Mindfulness on Saturday Jan 27. So registration is closed. There is a wait list, if you did not get registered before it closed. I am sorry for any disappointment this has caused, but the space is limited.

In the times in which we are living it is important that we recall the great folks who have gone before and shown us the way to be compassionate human beings. I have included information below about al those who are depicted in the statue above.

I hope that you will be able to be with us sometime this weekend. In the meantime, I hope this can water some seeds of joy…sing along!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xctzp0dp9uc&feature=share

with much love the joy of interbeing with you,
Joanne

DIRECTIONS TO THE WEST HOME

We live about 2 miles from URI. From rt 138, go north onto Old North Rd. (across the street from big sign ““Kingston Hill Store Books Used and Rare””. Also, just a smidge west of the 138/108 traffic light). Old North Rd starts off as a one way, continues on as a two way street, and finally ends as a T. You will see our corner property from there. Go left at the T (Old North Rd meets Stoneyfort Rd), and then a quick right onto Plantation Dr. We are the first home on the right (2nd driveway is easiest). Come on in the side door (porch/kitchen)!

The Remember Them: Champions For Humanity Monument, by Oakland sculptor Mario Chiodo, is located in the Henry J. Kaiser Memorial Park at the corner of 19th and Rashida Muhammad Streets. The bronze with cast stone base sculpture measures 25′ high and 52′ wide, covers 1,000 sq. ft. and is in four sections weighing over 60,000 lbs. With four sections, this is the largest bronze monument on the west coast, and the only monument in the country dedicated to Civil Rights.

The Remember Them Monument highlights the accomplishments of 25 global humanitarians: 2 (Oakland Local list)

  • The Rev. Ralph David Abernathy (1926-1990): Partner with Martin Luther King Jr. in civil rights activism
  • Maya Angelou (1928-2014): Poet, playwright, civil rights activist
  • Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906): Human rights activist who fought for women’s suffrage and the abolition of slavery
  • Ruby Bridges (1954-present): At age 6 braved an angry mob to become first black student in all-white school in the South
  • Cesar Chavez (1927-1993): Civil rights activist and agricultural workers labor leader
  • Chief Joseph (1846-1904): Head of the Nez Perce Nation and human rights activist
  • Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965): British prime minister during WWII, alone at first against Nazi fascism
  • Frederick Douglass (1817-1895): A former slave who became a foremost leader in the abolitionist movement
  • Shirin Ebadi (1947-present): Human rights activist for Middle East issues and Nobel Peace Prize winner
  • Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948): Pacifist who lead India to independence from Great Britain
  • Helen Keller (1880-1968): Fought for rights for those with disabilities
  • Coretta Scott King (1927-2006): Civil rights activist
  • The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968): Civil rights leader
  • Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865): American president who abolished slavery
  • Nelson Mandela (1918-2013): Human rights activist and first democratically elected president of South Africa
  • Harvey Milk (1930-1978): A leader of the gay rights movement
  • Mother Teresa (1910-1997): Leader of the Order of the Missionaries of Charity, won 1979 Nobel Peace Prize
  • Rosa Parks (1913-2005): Civil rights activist
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945): United States president during WWII, who also established the United Nations
  • Oskar Schindler (1908-1974): German business man who outwitted Nazis to save more than 1,200 Jewish lives
  • Thich Nhat Hanh (1926-present): Pacifist Vietnamese Buddhist monk who is a human rights and anti-war activist
  • Rigoberta Menchu Tum (1959-present): Human rights activist for indigenous people in Latin America
  • The Unknown Rebel of Tiananmen Square (1989): Stood in front of tanks during student human rights uprising in China
  • Elie Wiesel (1928-present): Holocaust survivor dedicated to preventing genocide
  • Malcolm X (1925-1965): Black nationalist, civil rights leader
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